Death Sites

Anhydrit (Anhydrite) Code name of the construction project in Himmelberg and Kammerforst as well as in the Harzungen, Ellrich and Bischofferode subcamps (Anhydrit, Anna, Ah, B3) Founded on 1 April 1944 with construction sites for tunnel excavation in Harzungen, Ellrich and Bischofferode for the Command Staff B3 and the Wirtschaftliche Forschungsgesellschaft mbH (WiFo). Initially under the jurisdiction of the Buchenwald Concentration Camp, after 28 October 1944 assigned to the Mittelbau Concentration Camp.
Artern Subcamp of the GolCamp, after 28 October 1944 assigned to the Mittelbau Concentration Camp.
Artern Subcamp of the Gollnow and Sons firm (code name: Geyer and Sons company); SS code name: Adorf, Neu Rebstock After 20 November 1944, initially construction and transport work for new production sites, then production of electrical equipment for V2 base components. Initially under the jurisdiction of the Buchenwald Concentration Camp, the Artern subcamp with its 254 inmates was assigned to the Mittelbau Concentration Camp in late December 1944.
B3 → Anhydrit  
B11 Construction project at the Kohnstein mountain, Niedersachswerfen  
Blankenburg Subcamp of Klosterwerke GmbH, Blankenburg/Harz (Oesig district) Organisation Todt After late August 1944, 500 mainly Belgian inmates worked at the construction sites of the "Porphyry" tunnel relocation project (tunnel construction at the Braunesumpf mine). The camp was initially under the jurisdiction of the Buchenwald Concentration Camp, and was reassigned to the Mittelbau Concentration Camp on 28 October 1944.
  Blankenburg-Regenstein, Lessingplatz in Heers (code name: "Tourmaline") After 1 February 1945, tunnel excavation by Organisation Todt for the planned tunnel facility of the Magdeburg company Schäffer und Budenberg GmbH ("Oda Works"); 400 male inmates, mostly Jewish.
Boelcke-Kaserne (Boelcke Barracks) Nordhausen, Rothenburgstrasse After 8 January 1945, the barracks initially housed several hundred inmates who worked as forced labourers in the tunnel excavation project at the Kohnstein mountain (B11 construction project) and for over 30 Nordhausen companies (in armaments production). After late January 1945, the camp served as the central sick bay and camp for dying Mittelbau Concentration Camp inmates. On 1 April 1945, 5,713 inmates were registered there.
Dora Code name for the subcamp of the Buchenwald Concentration Camp near Nordhausen-Salza, after June 1944: Mittelbau I Founded: 27 August 1943 with 107 inmates. In late December 1943, 10,500 inmates were already at the Kohnstein mountain near Nordhausen. They had to pe1944, Dora and its subcamps, which housed 32,532 inmates, were removed from the jurisdiction of the Buchenwald camp system and converted to an independent concentration camp.
Ellrich Ellrich-Juliushütte
SS name: Erich, after June 1944 Mittelbau II
Inmates deployments at: SS Commend Staff B3a, B11, B12, B13, B17
Founded: 2 May 1944; with an average of 8,000 inmates the largest subcamp of the Mittelbau complex. The camp inmates worked as forced labourers, performing heavy labour primarily for the tunnel excavations at the Kohnstein mountain (B11 and B12 construction projects) and at the Himmelsberg mountains (B3a), as well as work for the Mittelwerk GmbH and numerous Ellrich firms. The camp was initially under the jurisdiction of the Buchenwald Concentration Camp, and was reassigned to the Mittelbau Concentration Camp on 28 October 1944.
Ellrich/Woffleben → Ellrich → Woffleben (The sources do not provide definitive information on this death site.)
Harzungen SS name: Hans; Mittelbau III Founded as a Buchenwald subcamp on 1 April 1944; reassigned to the Mittelbau concentration camp on 28 October 1944 as the third largest subcamp with 4,009 inmates (on 1 November 1944). Inmates worked in tunnel excavation and construction labour for the SS Command Staff B3 (tunnel relocation project at the Himmelsberg mountain for the Junkers Flugzeug- und Motorenwerke AG) and for other relocation projects.
Ilfeld Ilfeld Foundied: 9 January 1945. Mittelwerk GmbH, the Saupe und Mulke company, Büro Prinz, AEG, Napola Ilfeld Infrastructure projects (relocating water mains, building a waterworks and two air-raid tunnels), building an assembly hall for the He162 "Volksjäger" in the Günther paper factory, tailor shop of the Mittelwerk GmbH. After liberation, sick and weakened inmates were housed in an auxiliary unit of the Nordhausen municipal hospital; some of these former inmates continued to die in late April and early May as a result of their incarceration.
Kleinbodungen SS camp name: Emmi 3 October 1944, rocket repair facility
Camp population: 621 inmates (31 December 1944)
Prisoners worked as forced labourers at Mittelwerk GmbH, repairing and warehousing defective V2 rockets.
Mittelbau Mittelbau Concentration Camp complex ("Mittelbau" is listed as the site of death when the consulted sources do not provide a definitive indication of the site of death.)
Osnabrück → SS-Baubrigade IV (SS Construction Brigade V)  
Osterhagen SS-Baubrigade III (SS Construction Brigade III) 5 July 1944: 300 inmates
Inmates worked for the SS Command Staff B13 Railway construction, excavation and ground-clearing work
Osterode Osterode-Freiheit Curt Heber company 25 September 1944: Camp population: 401 inmates (31 December 1944) Inmates worked at Hebers Maschinen- und Apparatefabrik (HEMAF), with some assigned to the Piller and Kellermann firms. Production of bomb dropping and other devices, logging work
Osterode-Petereshütte Osterode SS camp name: Dachs IV Founded: 20 November 1944
Camp population: 100 male inmates in November 1944, 800 inmates in early March 1945
Inmates worked at Rhenania-Ossag AG, Einsatzgruppe IV of the Organisation Todt, performing forced labour in construction, tunnel excavation (establishing an underground oil refinery)
Rottleberode Subcamp of the SS Command Staff A5, Heinrich (Tunnel project in the Heimkehle caves for the Junkers Flugzeug- und Motorenwerke AG), after July 1944 Thyra Works (code name for Junkers), Uftrungen lumber mill Founded: 13 March 1944 with 200 inmates, who had to perform heavy forced labour in construction and assembly on the construction site for the underground relocation of the Junkers Schönebeck subsidiary. An average of 600 inmates worked there. Beginning in July 1944, aircraft parts were assembled for Junkers in underground facilities. The subcamp was initially under the jurisdiction of the Buchenwald Concentration Camp and was reassigned to the Mittelbau Concentration Camp on 28 October 1944.
Rehungen Neusollstedt shaft, SS Construction Brigade I Founded: 10 September 1944 on the grounds of the abandoned Neusollstedt potash mine with 550 inmates. Construction of an underground materials warehouse, roadway and barracks construction
Assigned to the Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp on 15 January 1945. In October 1944, the SS moved around 200 inmates from Rehungen to a newly established subcamp of the SS Construction Brigade I in Hohlstedt. The Rehungen subcamp was first under the jurisdiction of Buchenwald, was reassigned to the Mittelbau Concentration Camp in October 1944, and then reassigned to the Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp in mid-January 1945.
SS-Baubrigade I (SS Construction Brigade I) → Rehungen  
SS-Baubrigade III (SS Construction Brigade III) → Osterhagen  
SS-Baubrigade IV (SS Construction Brigade IV) Ellrich-Bürgergarten A total of eight SS railway construction brigades made up the “concentration camp on railway tracks”, which existed through the end of the war. Each camp was comprised of one railway train with up to 50 wagons, which housed the inmates and guards.
5. SS-Eisenbahn-Baubrigade (5th SS Railway Construction Brigade) Site: After 8 October 1944 briefly in Heringen, after mid-October 1944 Osnabrück Founded: 8 October 1944
Prisoner population: an average of 504 inmates
Prisoners worked at the Reich Railway and the Osnabrück municipal administration, performing forced labour on railway track construction and repair and clearing rubble after bombing raids
On 8 October 1944, 180 inmates were brought to Heringen via Buchenwald and the Dora Camp. Soon thereafter, the SS transported them to Osnabrück, where along with other prisoners they formed the 5th SS Railway Construction Brigade.
SS-Baubrigade 6 (SS Construction Brigade 6) SS camp name: SS Railway Construction Brigade 1, later SS Railway Construction Brigade 6 Berga (Saxony-Anhalt), railway station; after October 1944 Bingerbrück, after November 1944 Brühl, near Cologne Founded: 12 September 1944
Camp population: 500 inmates
Inmates performed forced labour on railway construction and repair, work on telephone shafts in Sangerhausen, construction and repair at the Cologne-Eifeltor railway station.
SS-Baubrigade 7 (SS Construction Brigade 7) Stuttgart, initially Karlsruhe SS camp name: 7th SS Railway Construction Brigade Founded: 19 September 1944
Camp population: 470 inmates (1 April 1945)
Inmates performed forced labour repairing damaged railway tracks to secure the transport of weapons to the Western front. Three-quarters of the inmates of the 7th SS Railway Construction Brigade were Polish, and nearly all the remaining were Russian. The 7th SS Railway Construction Brigade was founded in mid September 1944 with 505 inmates as the “2nd Railway Construction Brigade” at the Auschwitz Concentration Camp. On 26 September, they arrived at their first location in Karlsruhe (presumably a railway grounds near the Autobahn access to Karlsruhe-Durlach). One month later the train continued to Stuttgart, where it remained at the Prague tunnel to the north of the main railway station until the evacuation. In October 1944 the brigade was renamed, briefly put under the jurisdiction of the Buchenwald Concentration Camp, and then reassigned to the Mittelbau Concentration Camp at the end of the month. On 13 January 1945, the 7th SS Railway Construction Brigade was reassigned to the Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp.
SS-Baubrigade 8 (SS Construction Brigade 8) Stuttgart (November to December 1944), Offenburg (20 December 1944 to late February 1945), Darmstadt (through mid March 1945) SS camp name: 8th SS Railway Construction Brigade Founded: 20 November 1944
Camp population: 504 inmates (20 November 1944)
Forced labour included repair of damaged railway tracks to secure the transport of weapons to the Western front; repair of a destroyed railway tunnel in Stuttgart. Camp locations were presumably rail facilities in Cannstadt (Stuttgart), the Offenburg railway station, and probably also the rail facilities in Erzhausen near Darmstadt. The 8th SS Railway Construction Brigade was established on 20 November 1944 in Sachsenhausen; nine days later it was reassigned to the Mittelbau Concentration Camp, and in January 1945 once again reassigned to Sachsenhausen.
Wieda Subcamp of the SS Railway Construction Brigade 3 Founded: 11 May 1944 during the construction of the Helmetal railway line, which was intended to relieve traffic on the Nordhausen-Ellrich-Osterhagen stretch, but which was never completed. The 311 inmates (16 May 1944) worked on railway construction for the SS Command Staff B13. As the main worksites of the SS Construction Brigade 3, the Mackenrode, Nüxei and Osterhagen auxiliary camps were under the jurisdiction of the Wieda subcamp. The SS Construction Brigade 3 was reassigned to the Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp in January 1945.
Woffleben Woffleben (today: district of the municipality of Ellrich) SS camp name: B 12 Founded: 3 January 1945 Camp population: 1,000 inmates Inmates worked for the SS Command Staff B 12, performing forced labour in construction, and particularly in tunnel excavation work.